Everest

International Program

Course Description Catalog 2017-2018

Everest Collegiate High School

 

 

 

Course Description Catalog

2017-2018

 

 

Introduction:

This catalog contains a brief description of each of the courses that Everest Collegiate High School offers. Each departmental section lists the courses projected for the school year and the course progressions within each department. All courses are dependent upon student interest and teacher availability; therefore, there is not a guarantee that all courses will be offered.

 

Mission Statement:

To shape Christian leaders who will transform society according to the standards of the Gospel. Everest is dedicated to providing the highest quality Catholic education through the development of the whole person (Integral Formation ®) encompassing the commitment to teach, to educate, and to form. Everest Collegiate High School graduates are motivated, self-confident Christian leaders who are prepared and committed to transform society.

 

Integral Formation:

Everest Collegiate High School implements the Integral Formation® method of education developed by the Legionaries of Christ. Used in over 150 schools around the world, Integral Formation® is built upon the Christian view of the person and focuses on forming all dimensions of the person - their intellectual, human, spiritual, and apostolic capacities. More simply put, we develop each child's knowledge, character, faith, and spirit of service, thus helping them fulfill the unique mission for which they were created.

 

Intellectual Formation:

Everest sets high, yet attainable, academic expectations for its students. Solid intellectual formation provides a wealth of knowledge and an ability to think, speak and write clearly, coherently, and persuasively. Students develop habits essential for ongoing success after graduation including study skills, concentration and critical thinking, perseverance, and a desire to produce high quality work.

 

Human Formation:

Character is at the core of authentic leadership. Character allows students to master themselves so as to be faithful to their personal convictions. Human formation is the development of a strong and virtuous character. This process involves assisting students to grow in virtue, self-confidence, and leadership skills. Their integrity, honesty, and compassion make them good and loyal friends. 

 

Spiritual Formation:

Spiritual formation aims to help students fulfill the mission for which they were created, developing a deep, personal and intimate relationship with Jesus Christ. Christ becomes the ultimate motive for all of a student's choices and actions. The student's intellectual and human growth comes to perfection through God's grace and through the student's spiritual efforts.

 

 

 

Apostolic Formation:

We seek to develop in our students the heart of an apostle, one that is sensitive and responsive to the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of others. Students perform concrete works of charity both within the school and for the larger community. Apostolic formation brings students into contact with the realities of life, awakening in them a sense of responsibility that will continue to be lived out as adults.

 

EC Graduation Requirements:   

 

4 credits of Theology

4 credits of English

4 credits of Social Studies                  (World History I, World History II, United States

History, Government, and Economics)

4 credits of Mathematics                    (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and a 4th year of

Math: Probability & Statistics, Pre-Calculus, or Calculus)

3 credits of Science                             (Biology, Chemistry, and Physics)

2 credits of Modern Language            (2 consecutive years of the same language)

1 credit of Technology

1 credit of Fine Arts

0.5 credits of Physical Education

0.5 credits of Health

2 credits of electives                           (Class of 2017-2019)

            or 2.5 credits of electives        (Class of 2020)

+          or 3 credits of electives           (Class of 2021 and beyond)

26 total credits                                    (Class of 2017-2019)

or 26.5 total credits                 (Class of 2020)

or 27 total credits                    (Class of 2021 and beyond)

 

Michigan Merit Curriculum:

 

4 credits of English

3 credits of Social Studies                  (World History, United States History, Government,

and Economics)

4 credits of Mathematics                    (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and a 4th year of

math)

3 credits of Science                             (Biology, Chemistry, or Physics and one additional

science credit) 

2 credits Modern Language

1 credit of Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts

0.5 credits of Physical Education

0.5 credits of Health

On-line Learning Experience             (Online Course, Learning, or Integrated Learning)

18 total credits

 

 

 

Curriculum Guide 9th-12th Grade

 

Freshman Year

Course

# of Credits

Theology

1

English 9 (Honors)

1

Algebra I or higher

1

Biology (Honors)

1

World History I

1

Modern Language

1

Technology (Computer Applications I & II)

1

Supplemental Hour (see page 5)

0.5

 

Sophomore Year

Course

# of Credits

Theology

1

 English 10 (Honors)

1

Geometry or higher

1

Chemistry (Honors)

1

World History II

1

Modern Language

1

Physical Education and Health

1

Supplemental Hour (see page 5)

0.5

 

Junior Year

Course

# of Credits

Theology

1

English 11 (Honors)

1

Algebra II or higher

1

Physics (Honors)

1

US History (AP)

1

Elective (Fine Arts)

1

Modern Language or Elective

1

Supplemental Hour (see page 5)

0.5

 

Senior Year

Course

# of Credits

Theology

1

English 12 (Honors/AP)

1

Pre-Calculus or higher (AP)

1

Government & Economics (AP)

1

Science (AP) or Elective

1

Modern Language or Elective

1

Elective (Fine Arts)

1

Supplemental Hour (see page 5)

0.5

 

Supplemental Hour:

This is a ½ credit elective hour that runs throughout the year on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays. It is available to all grade levels. Freshmen may choose from a limited selection of electives, including Art Foundations, Astronomy, Band, Choir, Drama, or 9/10 Seminar. All other students may take any available ½ credit elective running during this hour, including a Study Hall. Courses will be offered based on enrollment determined during the course registration process in the spring of the preceding year.

 

Independent Studies:

This catalog provides a comprehensive list of the courses offered at Everest Collegiate. In previous years, students were allowed to create independent studies as electives. Due to the increase in elective courses now offered by the school, as well as the nature of the teachers’ schedules, independent studies will no longer be offered.

 

Study Hall:

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are on track to graduate on time may request a Study Hall, but the request will only be met if the student is available during pre-scheduled Study Hall class periods. Students will not use a running class, an empty classroom, or an unattended hallway as a Study Hall.

 

Honors Courses:

Honors courses are more advanced and faster-paced than the college track courses that EC offers. Honors courses will require additional readings, papers, and assignments; they will also be graded according to more demanding standards than the college track course. At this time, the English and Science departments offer honors courses.  Students may choose to enroll in an honors course if they have previously achieved a B- (80%) or better average in the previous semester of the same subject.  Department/teacher and counselor approval will also be required for a student to select an honors course. In addition, a student must maintain a B- (80%) average in the course in order to continue on the honors track. Students who elect to enroll in honors courses at Everest Collegiate should be aware of the increased work load as well as the increase in level of course difficulty. These courses require a one-semester commitment.

 

Advanced Placement Courses (AP):

Advanced Placement Courses are extremely rigorous and are designed to follow a college level format. These courses move at a fast pace, equivalent to that of a college course. At this time several departments offer AP courses in which students may elect to enroll. (Students wishing to enroll in AP courses not currently taught at EC may do so through our online program with Clarkston High School.) Students may choose to enroll in an AP course if they have previously achieved a B (83%) [or a B- (80%) for the Math department, and B+ (87%) for AP Chemistry and Physics] or better average in both semesters of the previous year of the same subject. Even after registering for an AP class, if a student’s second semester grade in the preceding course is below the above-mentioned prerequisite grade, he or she will be dropped from the AP course before the next school year begins. If this happens, the student will be placed into the best fitting open course during that class period. Other class options cannot be guaranteed. An application, including department/teacher and counselor approval, will be required for a student to select an AP course. The applications for 2017-2018 were due February 16, 2017.

 

Students enrolled in AP courses will be encouraged but not required to take the AP exams in May; however, students who enroll in AP classes through the online program may be required to take the AP exam as part of their course grade. Successful completion of the AP exam may result in the awarding of college credit to the student. This is based upon individual university requirements and standards, and the student should research the policies of various institutions regarding possible credits given. Students must take the AP Exam in order to receive their Everest-sponsored 1.0 GPA boost for the AP course. There is a monetary fee associated with taking the AP Exam. College Board determines the fee every year. For the 2016-2017 school year the fee was $93. This is subject to change per College Board. AP Exam fees are the responsibility of the parent and student. Students who elect to enroll in Advanced Placement courses at Everest Collegiate should be aware of the increased work load, the accelerated pace of the course, the increase in level of course difficulty, and the minimum one-semester commitment. Honors courses are recommended to prepare students for AP-level work.

 

Honors and Advanced Placement Registration:

In selecting an Honors or Advanced Placement course, students and parents will make a minimum commitment of one full semester. Withdrawal from an AP or Honors course will only be considered at the end of the semester, and transfer into another course will be based upon availability and may not always be possible. Completion of a signed agreement, which specifies such a commitment, will be necessary to finalize the registration process. This agreement (the aforementioned application, in the case of AP courses) must be signed and returned to the counselor before the student will be considered enrolled in the course. Again, any request to drop the course or transfer to another course will not be considered until the end of the first semester. These courses are anchored in a very rigorous curriculum.  The learning will be challenging and stimulating and will move at a faster pace than the average class. As such, when students register for these courses and the school provides the staffing, ever mindful of class size and teacher load, the student cannot make a different choice after the fact. Such requests negatively impact class size and staffing decisions already made.

 

 

 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT:

 

English 9 – Composition & World Literature (Honors):                                                                        

The world literature course is intended to introduce students to a broad range of literary texts from various geographical areas, historical time periods, and cultural standpoints. The course will examine how literature expresses, reflects, and shapes human experience, as well as help to structure meaning in a given culture. The readings will cover literature from early civilization through the twentieth century. Students will learn to participate meaningfully in academic and cultural debates through discussion as well as through formal and informal writings. Special emphasis will be placed on the research paper and public speaking. Grammar and mechanics are taught to the appropriate grade level. A structured vocabulary program is included as part of this course. Honors English will require the reading of one extra book per quarter as well as an extra paper or project.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

English 10 – Composition & World Literature (Honors):                                                                                                                                              

This course surveys a variety of world literature from the medieval ages to the modern era. Students study literature according to time periods and common, universal themes. While students respond to literature formally and informally, emphasis is placed on the research paper, formal and informal essays, and public speaking and debate. Grammar and mechanics are taught to the appropriate grade level. A structured vocabulary program is included as part of this course. Honors English will require the reading of one extra book per quarter as well as an extra paper or project.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

English 11 – Composition & American Literature (Honors):             

This course surveys American works and authors from pre-colonial to contemporary times. These include the works of Nathaniel Hawthorne, John Steinbeck, Flannery O’Connor and Ralph Waldo Emerson. The works of William Shakespeare will also be incorporated. This course prepares the student for specific writing experiences such as the analytical paper, formal research paper, and oral class presentation. Emphasis is given to logic and the construction of sound arguments in written and oral form. Honors English will require the reading of one extra book per quarter as well as an extra paper or project.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

English 12 – Composition & British Literature (Honors):

This course will introduce students to a wide range of works and authors in the British tradition. Since the history of British literature is long and rich, the readings will represent highlights of that history rather than a complete survey. This course is designed to work towards mastery of skills learned and developed in earlier grades.  Students will achieve mastery in writing and grammar through practice in writing essays, compositions, journals, and research papers.  Reading includes short stories, essays, novels, plays, and poetry.  Students will discuss various ways of interpreting the works through class discussion, writing assignments, and traditional lectures. This course will also focus on research, public speaking and debate. Honors English will require the reading of one extra book per quarter as well as an extra paper or project.

Credit Earned: 1.0

AP English Literature and Composition (12th grade elective):  

This course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. This course will prepare students for the AP exam in May.

Pre-requisite:  Successful completion of both semesters of English 11 with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Business and Technical Writing (10/11/12th grade elective):

This course offers an introduction to the techniques and types of professional writing, including correspondence and reports. It is designed to help strengthen skills of effective business and professional communication in both oral and written modes. After successful completion of this course, students will have the skills necessary to communicate effectively in a variety of professional situations. Each project in the course is paired with a selection of readings and resources. Projects are designed to complement each other, and approaching the course as a whole exposes students to a variety of business and professional writing situations.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Mythology (10/11/12th grade elective): 

Knowledge of Classical Mythology is an invaluable resource for understanding the art and thought of the Western tradition, providing a vast set of stories and symbols of ancient and modern writers, artists, and thinkers.  The study of Mythology centers on the influence it has had, and still exerts, on Civilization. We will study the Olympians and other major divinities, heroes and fraught families.  From Athena to Zeus, the characters and stories of Classical Mythology have inspired and shaped classic and modern themes in art, literature, music, cinema, and iconography and in the world of popular culture and modern advertisement. The deeper meaning of visual and aural art (art works, film and opera), literature (from the great Greek and Roman writers through Shakespeare and to the present), and other artistic genres will be greatly enhanced as you cultivate your ability to recognize and appreciate the lore of Classical Mythology as it pervades the Western artistic and intellectual tradition.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Shakespeare (10/11/12th grade elective):

Students in this course will sample the comedies, histories, tragedies, romances and sonnets of an author whose impact on the English language was arguably one of the greatest influences in literature. Shakespeare's plays are brought to life through readings, audio recordings, films, and live productions (when available). The course's goal is to give the student an appreciation for Shakespeare's immense contribution to our theatrical and literary culture.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT:    

 

Algebra I:

The content of Algebra I is organized around families of functions, with special emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. As the students study each family of functions, they will learn to represent them in multiple ways - as verbal descriptions, equations, tables, and graphs. The students will also learn to model real world situations, using functions in order to solve the problems that arise. In addition, Algebra I includes lessons on probability and data analysis as well as examples and exercises involving geometry.  

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Geometry:        

In this course, the students will develop reasoning and problem solving skills as they study topics such as congruence and similarity; they will also apply properties of lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles.  The students will also develop problem solving skills by using length, perimeter, area, circumference, surface area, and volume to solve real world problems. In addition to its geometry content, this course includes numerous examples involving algebra, data analysis, and probability.  Much of the course will be used to develop the idea of proofs.  Proofs will be done throughout the course, and students will be expected to write two column proofs, flow proofs, and paragraph proofs that will prepare them for Algebra II and Pre-Calculus.

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Algebra II:

The content of Algebra II is organized around families of functions, including linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions.  Students will study each family of functions and will learn to represent them in multiple ways—as verbal descriptions, equations, tables, and graphs. They will also learn to model real-world situations using functions in order to solve problems arising from those situations. In addition to its algebraic content, Algebra II includes lessons on probability and data analysis as well as numerous examples and exercises involving geometry and trigonometry.  Students will be required to relate their trigonometric understanding of triangles to circles, and understand the uses of trigonometry in real world situations.

Prerequisite: Geometry

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Honors Pre-Calculus:

Pre-Calculus introduces students to the main concepts of calculus: functions, rates of change, and accumulation.  A large portion of the course will be spent analyzing the different functions learned in Algebra II as well as other basic functions. Students need a solid foundation in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry for successful completion of pre-calculus. Students will explore the concepts and skills necessary to construct quantitative models of change and to deduce their consequences. This course lays the foundation for advanced studies in the fields of theoretical and applied physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, and engineering.  Honors credit is automatically granted to this course.

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Department Approval

Credit Earned: 1.0

Probability and Statistics (11/12th grade elective):

The purpose of Probability & Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.

Students are exposed to five broad conceptual themes:  

1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns.

2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study.

3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation.

4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

5. Probability: Determining the likelihood of particular events using theoretical and experimental methods.

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Department Approval

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Calculus (11/12th grade elective):

Topics for this college-level course include the following: limits, derivatives of algebraic functions and applications, integration and applications, plane analytic geometry, transcendental functions and applications of the integral. Students should have a deep understanding of all of the basic functions coming into Calculus.  All algebra skills should be mastered coming in to the year.  After successful completion of Calculus, students will be able to find instantaneous rates of change, areas under curves, and many other dynamic measurements.

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or Department Approval

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

AP Calculus AB (11/12th grade elective):

Topics for this college-level course include the following: limits, derivatives of algebraic functions and applications, integration and applications, plane analytic geometry, transcendental functions and applications of the integral. Students should have a deep understanding of all of the basic functions coming into Calculus.  All algebra skills should be mastered coming in to the year.  After successful completion of Calculus, students will be able to find instantaneous rates of change, areas under curves, and many other dynamic measurements. Two weeks will be set aside at the end of the course to review for the AP Exam in which students will be able to earn 4 credits towards college Calculus.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of both semesters of Pre-Calculus with a B- (80%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

AP Calculus BC (11/12th grade elective):

This course includes the same topics of study as Calculus AB including additional integration techniques and polynomial approximation methods and series; however, it moves at a much faster pace than Calculus. This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in May.  Many problems discussed in AP Calculus are more detailed than those covered in regular Calculus.  Students should expect a rigorous workload and a challenging year. With successful completion of the AP exam in May (a score of 4 or 5), students could earn up to 8 credits towards college.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of both semesters of Pre-Calculus with a B- (80%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.
Credit Earned: 1.0

 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT:

 

Biology (Honors):  

Students will identify the unique properties of living systems as they relate to cells and organic molecules. Students will examine ecosystems and their characteristics. Students will explain the process of genetic reproduction and how traits are inherited, define evolution, and examine factors that influence population growth and decline. Students will describe how different species of plants, animals and microorganisms that live today are related. Students will participate in labs that reinforce the biological concepts learned.

Credit Earned: 1.0    

      

Chemistry (Honors):

The structure and behavior of matter is studied. Topics include: atomic theory, periodic table, bonding, energy, problem solving, measurements, chemical reactions, gas laws, equilibrium, solutions and acids and bases. Laboratory work is intended to help develop and support topic areas. A large part of the course requires a comprehensive understanding of Algebra.

Prerequisite: Biology

Credit Earned: 1.0        

 

Physics (Honors):

Topics include the study of motion, forces, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, and light. After students have an understanding of the concept, they learn and apply the mathematics underlying the concept. Higher level thinking skills are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

Credit Earned: 1.0       

 

AP Biology (11/12th grade elective):

Advanced Placement Biology is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college biology course. Students begin the first semester by reviewing the summer reading assignments. As recommended by the College Board, students develop an understanding of the major topics of biology, including biochemistry, molecular biology, cells, heredity, evolution, organisms, and populations. Through a variety of laboratory experiences, including those recommended by the College Board, students apply their understanding of scientific concepts. This course will prepare students for the AP exam in May.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of Chemistry with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

 

 

AP Chemistry (11/12th grade elective):

This course is designed to let science students do rigorous work and prepare for the Advanced Placement Examination in Chemistry.  It meets the general objectives of an introductory chemistry course at the freshman college level. Theoretical aspects of chemistry are emphasized. Major topics include the following: structure of matter, chemical bonding, kinetic theory of gases, stoichiometry, solids, liquids, change of state, equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, solution chemistry, acid-based chemistry, chemical kinetics, electro-chemistry, and basic concepts of thermodynamics. This course may require occasional time after school to complete experiments. This course will prepare students for the AP exam in May.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry with a B+ (87%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

AP Chemistry Laboratory (11/12th grade elective AP Chemistry students):

Experiments in general chemistry; stoichiometry, calorimetry, electrochemistry, molecular geometry, gas laws, kinetics, acids and bases, redox and acid base titrations; spectrophotometric and gravimetric analysis; preparation and analysis of coordination complexes of nickel, iron, and cobalt. 

Prerequisite: Must be simultaneously enrolled in AP Chemistry.

Credit Earned 0.5

 

AP Physics C (12th grade elective):

AP Physics C Mechanics is a year-long high school course that is equivalent to the first semester of calculus-based college Physics. Students can enter AP Physics after first taking Physics. Students move quickly through the concepts and focus on problem solving, data analysis, and laboratory development. Homework will be 3-5 hours per week. The AP Physics C course is ideal for all college-bound high school students, especially those considering engineering. 

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Calculus. Successful completion of Honors Physics with a B+ (87%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Anatomy and Physiology (11/12th grade elective):

This course is concerned with the structure and function of the human body. The skin, skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, and reproductive systems may be studied.  Dissection activities are required.  This course is recommended for students interested in knowing more about their own bodies and will be of special interest to those students considering careers in the medical sciences, physical education, and veterinary science.

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Astronomy (9-12th elective):

This course is designed for anyone who is interested in learning about the structure and functionality of our universe.  Topics in astronomy range from our solar system, the life cycle of stars, exoplanets, objects such as asteroids and comets, galaxies, black holes, the history of astronomy, and space travel. The course will also include ideas about the tools of the scientific method, philosophical discussions about the possibility of alien life forms, and how astronomy and theology can coexist. No prior knowledge about astronomy is required for this course, but some basic algebra skills are necessary. Some mathematics and physics will also be explored throughout the course.

Prerequisite: 83% or higher in Algebra I during the 8th or 9th grade year.

*Beginning in 2018-2019, this course will be offered on alternating years as a single gender course. For the introductory year only (2017-2018), the course may be available in a boys’ section and a girls’ section based on enrollment.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT:

 

World History I:

This course includes the study of human progress from prehistoric times to the Middle Ages with special emphasis on the interaction of people and nations. World history will be learned through social, political, cultural, and religious developments. Topics include: Ancient Civilizations, Empires of the Eastern and Western Worlds, and the Middle Ages. Students will develop their analytical and critical thinking skills.

Credit Earned: 1.0           

 

World History II:

World History II is a continuation of the study of human progress from the Renaissance to the present with a special emphasis on the interaction of peoples and nations. World history will be learned through social, political, cultural, and technological developments. Topics include: the Renaissance, Age of Revolutions, Age of Explorations, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, World Wars I and II, and the fall of Communism. Students will continue to develop their analytical and critical thinking skills.

Credit Earned: 1.0            

 

United States History:

This course is a study of United States history from Reconstruction through the present.  In addition to learning the primary historical facts and understanding the major movements in the development of the United States, students will be expected to comprehend the philosophical concepts which have distinguished the nation from its founding to the present. The goal of the course is to give the students a thorough understanding of the events, issues, ideas, and people that have shaped our nation.

Credit Earned: 1.0           

 

AP United States History (11th grade elective):

This course is designed as a college-level course that will require students to develop the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with United States history. Students will learn to access historical materials and be able to interpret the importance of these materials as they pertain to historical reasoning. Students will learn to analyze and interpret primary sources, including documentary materials, maps, video sources, and graphic evidence of historical events.  They will be tested on their grasp of historical knowledge through multiple-choice tests similar to the AP exam. There will be written essays and analytical research papers to teach the students to express themselves clearly and precisely and to cite sources and credit the writing and ideas of others.  This will prepare students to take the AP exam in May.

Prerequisites:  Successful completion of both semesters of World History II with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0        

 

AP European History (11/12th grade elective):

This course surveys the social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political, and diplomatic history of modern Europe and its place in the history of the world—from the fall of Constantinople to the fall of the Berlin Wall and collapse of the Soviet Union. The course is equivalent to a college freshman or sophomore modern European history course. Students develop an understanding of the major periods, ideas, movements, trends, and themes that characterize European history from approximately 1450 to the present. They also develop the ability to analyze historical evidence and express their understanding and analysis in writing. This course prepares students for the AP European History exam.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of the preceding History course with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

United States Government:

Students will build on the knowledge and skills developed in United States history and geography classes.  They will develop their historical thinking skills through the appropriate and effective use of a wide variety of primary, secondary, and tertiary sources.  Students will analyze the political, social, economic, and cultural influences on our nation’s history as well as assess the significance of historical events from their positions as citizens and members of a presidential republican system.  The course includes both the general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and analysis of specific examples.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Economics:

This introductory course in the study of economics begins with an introduction to the concept of economics and an examination of the American economic system. Students will learn the tools of microeconomics, including supply and demand model and market structures. The course also introduces macroeconomics topics, including the measures of economic performance and the government’s role in the domestic and global economy.

Credit earned: 0.5

 

History of Warfare (11/12th grade elective*):

The focus of this course will be on politics and international relations—the origins and consequences of wars—and on the evolution of military technologies, rather than the details of battles or military strategy. We will not try to construct a single narrative of military experience, nor will we try to examine every society at every time. Although broadly inclusive of many times and places, we will follow several innovations in military practice as their implications careened around the globe.

*Due to Mrs. Hearn’s fall 2017 maternity leave, this course will not be available during the Supplemental Hour. Therefore, it is listed as an 11/12th grade elective.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Life Skills (10/11/12th grade elective):

This course is designed to provide students with basic information and skills needed to be successful in adult life, with a focus on using technology to aid in completing daily responsibilities (budgeting and matters of personal finance, meal planning, and organizing appointments and responsibilities). Students will focus on how to handle common situations in college, such as sharing their faith, communicating with professors, petitioning grades, etc. They will also discuss Christian stewardship in college life.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Michigan History (11/12th grade elective*):

This course will cover the period from the glaciers to the present day. It will feature important elements in and significant contributions to Michigan’s achievement of statehood, the Civil War, logging, and mining. Special attention will be paid to the growth of the automobile industry and its importance to Michigan in the 21st century. Students in this course will partner with the Detroit Historical Museum “high school docent program.” This course will require some daytime off-campus field experiences.

*Due to Mrs. Hearn’s fall 2017 maternity leave, this course will not be available during the Supplemental Hour. Therefore, it is listed as an 11/12th grade elective.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

MODERN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT:

 

Spanish I:

This course will introduce the student to the Spanish language and culture. It will provide the student with skills in the four areas of the language: listening, reading, writing and speaking. The student will learn relevant and high frequency vocabulary and basic grammar concepts that will enable communication in personalized and creative situations. This course will begin to prepare students for total immersion into the language and culture, but it is designed as an introductory Spanish course.

Credit Earned: 1.0     

 

Spanish II:

This course focuses on developing more advanced conversational skills, expanding on vocabulary, improving writing skills, and introducing new cultural themes.  At the beginning of the course, students will have the opportunity to review previous concepts and knowledge while developing a total immersion in the language.  Students will also be prepared to discuss and describe situations and activities in the present and past tense. 

Prerequisite: Spanish I or Department Approval

Credit Earned: 1.0          

 

Spanish III (elective):

This course will help the students expand their knowledge of the language by concentrating on their conversational and writing skills, exploring new grammatical concepts and developing reading comprehension of more complex texts in a total immersion environment.

Prerequisite: Spanish II or Department Approval

Credit Earned: 1.0         

 

Spanish IV (elective):                                  

This course will continue to expose the students to more advanced grammatical concepts while challenging them to work on their conversational and writing skills.  Students will become more efficient readers by focusing on their reading comprehension.  This course will also polish some of the grammatical concepts covered in previous courses as well as introduce new and more advanced grammatical concepts.

Prerequisite: Spanish III or Department Approval

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

THEOLOGY DEPARTMENT:

 

 

Semester 1

Semester 2

Freshmen

 

The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture

The Blessed Trinity

Sophomores

 

The Mystery of Redemption

The Church: Sacrament of Salvation

Juniors

 

Sacraments as Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ

Moral Life in Jesus Christ

Seniors

 

Scripture

History of the Catholic Church

 

The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture:

This course is a one semester freshman course intended to give students general knowledge and appreciation of Sacred Scripture. Through the study of the Bible, the student will come to encounter the Living Word of God, Jesus Christ. The student will learn about the Bible, authored by God through inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. Through reading the Bible, familiarization of its structure with particular attention to the Gospels will help the student to grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

The Blessed Trinity:

This course is a one semester freshman course intended to introduce students to the mystery of Blessed Trinity. Focusing on Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, and the second person of the Blessed Trinity.  It continues what The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture began by using Scripture as a focus on Christ. The student will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate Revelation to us of God. In learning about who He is, the student will also learn who He calls them to be.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

The Mystery of Redemption:

This course is a one semester sophomore course intended to help the student understand all that God has done for mankind through His Son, Jesus Christ.  In this course of study, the student will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share eternal happiness with Him, which is accomplished through the redemption that Christ won for us. The student will learn that he or she shares in this redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. The student will be introduced to what it means to be a disciple of Christ, and what the life of a disciple entails.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

The Church: Sacrament of Salvation:

This course is a one semester sophomore course meant to follow The Mystery of Redemption. This course will help the student understand that in and through the Church he or she encounters the living Jesus Christ. The student will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by Him through the Holy Spirit. The student will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both divine and human elements. The student will learn not so much about events in the life of the Church, but about the sacred nature of the Church.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Sacraments as Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ:

This course is a one semester junior course meant to highlight the importance of the sacraments as the source of our life in Christ. In this course the students will complete an intensive study of each of the seven sacraments. The course will present the theology of each sacrament and the implications that each sacrament has for living the Christian life. Students will understand the sacraments as the ordinary means by which God dispenses sanctifying grace to His people.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Moral Life in Jesus Christ:

This course is a one semester junior course intended to immerse the student in an in-depth study of Catholic morality. This course will present a basis for moral theology and investigate the importance of freedom and conscience. The student will gain an understanding of the reality and danger of sin, framed within a study of the Ten Commandments. The course lends particular emphasis to the Catechism of the Catholic Church and Veritatis Splendor.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Scripture:

This course is a one semester senior course intended to engage the student in a deeper study of the Holy Scriptures. This course will present the student with a Catholic approach to the Scriptures, highlighting the theme of covenant. Tracing a path through salvation history, the student will understand the various books of the Bible and the importance of each event in salvation history.  The course will include a study of both Old and New Testament events in salvation history, culminating in the birth of the Church.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

History of the Catholic Church:

This course is a one semester senior course meant to explore the Church’s history from the earthly life of Christ to the present day. This course continues what the Scripture course began, detailing how God sent the Holy Spirit to act through the Church and her members. Special emphasis is given to the role of saints and Popes to further the mission of the Church throughout the entire world. The student will be presented with a narrative of Church history along with stories of other important historical figures as they became interwoven with the events they helped to shape.

Credit Earned: 0 .5

 

 

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT:

 

Introduction to Philosophy (10/11/12th grade elective):

In this course students will be introduced to classic philosophical principles, enabling them to understand the vital relationship between reason and Christian faith, develop clear and logically-sound reasoning habits that will support their faith, and recognize philosophical errors and their consequences in modern culture.  Covered topics include a survey of Greek philosophy; epistemology (studying the origin, nature, methods, and limits of human knowledge); moral and social philosophy; and the basics of metaphysics and ontology (studying first principles and the nature of man’s and God’s existence).

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT:

 

Physical Education:

This is a semester course with the goal of helping students to use decision-making processes to select appropriate physical activities to achieve fitness and to demonstrate an understanding of the training and skill work necessary to improve fitness. The students will learn rules, skills, and strategies associated with many physical activities. Units may include basketball, volleyball, soccer, flag football, floor hockey, personal fitness and weight training. In addition, students will learn to make informed decisions in the following priority health areas: promoting healthful nutrition and dietary practice, promoting physical fitness, reducing and preventing intentional or unintentional injuries.
Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Health:    

This course focuses on topics relating to drugs, alcohol, and nutrition education, as well as providing a view of chastity as the Catholic, Christian approach to human sexuality. The emphasis of the Drug and Alcohol Unit focuses on alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. National and regional research continues to cite these three substances as the highest used drugs among 10th through 12th graders. The emphasis of Health class is to use knowledge to promote responsible decision making and an understanding of the consequences of one’s choices and actions. Students will build this knowledge base through discussion of the issues, reflections on stories/art that deals with the issues, scientific and medical facts, and current research.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Strength and Conditioning (10/11/12th grade elective):

The primary purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to learn fitness concepts and conditioning techniques used for obtaining optimal physical fitness. Students will benefit from comprehensive weight training and cardio-respiratory endurance activities.  Students will learn the fundamentals of strength training, aerobic training, and overall fitness training and conditioning.  The course includes both lecture and activity sessions.  Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime. This course has a limited student capacity.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT*:

*all Fine Arts courses are co-ed

 

Art Foundations (9-12th grade elective):

Art Foundations offers all students an opportunity to discover their own creativity while acquiring knowledge and skill in art through its elements (color, texture, form, value, line, and shape/space). These skills, along with the various elements of art, become the basis of the students’ art experience in high school. Students complete assignments in the areas of drawing, painting, sculpture, and art history.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Art History (10/11/12th grade elective)

Art History is a survey course, which focuses on the question: "What purpose does art serve?" It takes the opportunity to study art throughout the ages, from Ancient Greece and Rome through the 21st century, with a focus on Christian themes of beauty, truth, and expression of belief in art. Through the study of painting, sculpture, and architecture, students will see how art is influenced by, and in turn influences, the culture of its time.

Credit Earned 0.5

 

AP Art History (11/12th grade elective):

The AP Art History course is equivalent to a two-semester introductory college course that explores topics such as the nature of art, art making, and responses to art. By investigating a specific image set of 250 works of art characterized by diverse artistic traditions from prehistory to the present, the course fosters in-depth, holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective. Students become active participants in the global art world, engaging with its forms and content, as they experience, research, discuss, read, and write about art, artists, art making, and responses to and interpretations of art. A visit to the Detroit Institute of Arts is a required field experience.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the preceding year’s History course with a B (83%) or better, and teacher/department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Band* (9-12th grade elective):

The Everest Collegiate High School band is open to any student (grades 9-12) with previous instrumental music experience. A wide variety of music for winds and percussion will be studied and performed throughout the year. Class activities will focus on the development of instrument technique, tone production, intonation, ensemble performance skills, and the fundamentals of music theory.

Prerequisite: Students in this class must have at least one year of prior instrumental music experience.

*Participation in this course will be required for those students who wish to earn a varsity letter in Band.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Choir (9-12th grade elective):

Choir is a course offered to both experienced and beginning singers, both male and female. Students with no musical background are welcome. The following musical skills for ensemble singing will be stressed:  proper breathing, pleasant vocal production, blend and balance, expansion of range, good intonation, ear training and sight reading. Various styles of choral literature will be explored. Performance opportunities will arise on multiple occasions. 

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Drama (9-12th grade elective):

Drama is a basic survey class that also gives the students an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of theater in the real life setting of the Everest Collegiate fall play and spring musical. In addition, students are exposed to various types of dramatic presentations. The students will study the various playwrights from the major periods, beginning with the Greeks onward to Modern American Drama. Students are responsible for monologues, research papers, presentations, and cultural events, as well as an active participation in class activities.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Speech (10/11/12th grade elective):

The primary purpose of this course is to improve the students’ public speaking skills.  
Students will study topic selection, audience analysis, research, outlining, speech
writing, and speech delivery.  Students will improve their verbal and nonverbal communication skills and will be able to present speeches successfully and confidently in a variety of real-world situations.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Yearbook (10/11/12th grade elective):

Students in the Yearbook class are the leaders and decision-makers of the yearbook staff of Everest Collegiate. Students will complete the myriad of tasks to create a quality yearbook that reflects the pictorial history of the activities for the present school year. This course will encompass aspects of journalism, creative writing, photography, and database management and computer applications. Using web-based yearbook software, students will be able to work on specific tasks remotely at school events to capture the essence of Everest spirit. This course is offered in a coeducational format due to the collective body of work produced.

Prerequisites: Students must have achieved A’s in Computer Applications I and II, as well as the prior year’s English course. Final approval necessary from Miss Mansour.

Credit Earned: 0.5 (if taken during the Supplemental Hour), or 1.0 (if taken during a regular elective period)

 

TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT:

 

Computer Applications I:

The first semester of Computer Applications focuses on proficiency in Microsoft Office.  Students will develop skills in using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Students will learn key features of these software applications and use them for word-processing, basic graphic design, data analysis, and presentations.  Since the course content strongly emphasizes practical uses of software, students will be primarily assessed on individual and group projects.  A USB thumb drive is required for this class.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Computer Applications II:

The second semester of Computer Applications focuses on website design and development. Students will learn the concepts of hypertext coding (HTML) and style sheets (CSS), and will apply their skills by creating a web site.  They will also begin working with Garage Band and iMovie applications.  A USB thumb drive is required.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Video Game Development (10/11/12th grade elective):

Not since the creation of film has a medium of communication allowed for such potential of creativity and interactivity of the audience. From the advent of Pong to the ubiquity of the Nintendo Wii and Candy Crush, video games have changed the way that people learn, communicate, and occupy their free time. In this elective students will have the chance to learn the basics of video game design and development. This will be accomplished through computer programming, variable manipulation, physics programming, and use of available technology to create a new game through their engineering. Through the course of the year students will have to create several different projects, culminating in one video game that they will submit for publishing on a digital distribution site. Interested students must show a willingness to learn programming using one of several computer programming languages. They will learn how to code, manipulate images, mix sound, and debug their games in the process.

Prerequisite: Computer Applications I and II

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Introduction to Computer Science (10/11/12th grade elective):

This course is a rigorous introduction to high-level programming. Students will learn fundamental Java programming skills and apply them to solve problems in a variety of disciplines such as Number Theory, Robotics, Cryptography, and Game Theory. The course is divided into 3 parts: basics of computer hardware and software, Object Oriented Programming with Karel J. Robot (http://bit.ly/kareljrobot), and features of the Java programming language.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I with a B (83%) average, and completion of Computer Applications II with a B (83%) average.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

AP Computer Science A (11/12th grade elective):

The AP Computer Science A course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions in the Java Programming Language that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. Considerable time will also be spent on preparing students to earn a score of 4 (or higher) on the AP Computer Science A Exam.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Introduction to Computer Science with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES:

 

9/10 Seminar (9/10th grade elective*):

The 9/10 Seminar is a course designed to promote a successful transition into high school, and provide a forum to learn about and discuss essential day-to-day skills. Taught by an Everest Collegiate teacher, along with administrative guest speakers, the course provides students with opportunities for academic enrichment and assistance, as well as the chance to improve organizational and communication abilities. The course will cover Catholic stewardship, various study skills, note-taking, test-preparation, research procedures, and reading and writing strategies. Students will also learn and practice new organizational skills, personal finance techniques, and more. The course will address social issues that affect underclassmen as they begin to explore high school and post-secondary planning.

*This single-gender class will be available to boys in 2017-2018, and girls in 2018-2019. The course will continue to be available to each gender in alternating years.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

 

 

ONLINE COURSES offered on-site through Clarkston Schools:

Students may elect to take a pre-approved course online through Clarkston Schools. These courses are designed to offer students a variety of electives and Advanced Placement Courses that Everest Collegiate High School does not currently offer. These courses require a great deal of independent learning and may not be suited for all students. Students will need a teacher recommendation, parent approval, and counselor approval before enrolling in an online course. Students will make a minimum of a one semester commitment to online courses. Once a student is enrolled in an online course, he or she will not be allowed to drop the course. If the student no longer wishes to continue in online classes the following semester, he or she may be allowed to enroll in an EC course; depending on course availability. Students and parents will be required to sign a form stating that they understand the nature of online courses and that they are committing to the course for the entire semester. This form MUST be signed and returned to the counseling office before a student can be enrolled in an online course. Clarkston Schools also requires additional paperwork to be filled out in order to register for online courses. This paperwork is handed out by Clarkston Schools at the beginning of each semester. In addition, Clarkston Schools also requires that all students enrolled in an online course have their birth certificate and immunization records on file.

 

Below is a list of courses that are available. It is important to note that Everest faculty cannot offer academic support for online courses. These courses require the student to work well independently. All academic support will come through the course’s online teacher. An Everest ‘mentor’ teacher is provided, ONLY to help facilitate efficient and effective delivery of the course information. If a student wishes to enroll in any online course not listed here, he or she must state in writing why this course is desired and submit it to the counseling department for consideration. All additional requests will require the counselor and Principal’s approval. Clarkston will cover the cost of one online course per semester, per student. Any additional online course registrations will incur a fee.

 

ONLINE AP COURSES:

 

AP Macroeconomics (12th grade elective):

Macroeconomics is an emphasis on how the economic system works as a whole. Students study how the economy is measured by using concepts such as gross domestic product (GDP) and other indicators. They examine concepts such as inflation, unemployment, world trade patterns, and the role of the Federal Reserve Bank. Students engage in decision-making processes to create an environment where high employment and a higher standard of living are achievable by using the economic tools of fiscal and monetary policy. This course prepares students for the AP Exam in Macroeconomics.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of U.S. History with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

AP Microeconomics (12th grade elective):

Microeconomics emphasizes how individuals make choices with limited resources. Students will examine concepts such as supply and demand, factors of production, roles of labor and management, the relationship between the environment and the economy, and the impact of the government on individual decision making processes. Students study the stock market as an investment option and trace various stocks through the semester using the Wall Street Journal and the Internet as resources. This course prepares students for the AP Exam in Microeconomics.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of U.S. History with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

AP Spanish (11/12th grade elective):

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP Spanish Language and Culture test. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. The course is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish. The course is based on the six themes required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of authentic Spanish-language materials and sources; demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using Spanish; gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of Spanish speaking areas of the world; use Spanish to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide-variety of contexts; develop insight into the nature of the Spanish language and its culture; and use Spanish to participate in communities at home and around the world. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a college level course. The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year college course.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of Spanish IV with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

AP Statistics (11/12th grade elective):

AP Statistics data analysis is dependent on the use of technology. Students should have access to computers that include software capable of doing data analysis. Students will be required to interpret output generated by statistical software programs. Students are not expected to learn how to use various statistical programs. In addition, one of the following Texas Instruments calculators is required: TI-83, TI-83+, TI-84, TI-84+, or a TI-89. The TI-83+ is the most popular calculator for AP Statistics. In most cases the calculator is sufficient but the fundamental tool of data analysis is the computer.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of Mathematics with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

AP U.S. Government & Politics (12th grade elective):

AP U.S. Government and Politics presents an analytic perspective on American politics. The course introduces students to the ideals, institutions, and processes that direct the daily operations of our government and shapes our public policies. Students will use a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations to interpret and analyze the political landscape to develop a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of our system of government.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of U.S. History with a B (83%) or better, and department approval through the AP course application, due February 16, 2017.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

ONLINE BUSINESS COURSE:

 

Entrepreneurship (10/11/12th grade elective):

Ever wonder what it takes to own your own business, be your own boss and write your own paycheck? Entrepreneurship helps students examine their readiness and passion for such an undertaking. Students will learn what entrepreneurship is all about, develop a business idea, conduct a feasibility analysis, identify their primary customer, learn about financing a business and write a business plan. They will also learn about how to manage their business, including the hiring process, operations, inventory controls and production management. The final step will be developing their strategic plan for the future to help bring their entrepreneurial dreams to reality.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

ONLINE ENGLISH COURSE:

 

Journalism (10/11/12th grade elective):

The basics of journalism--including laws and ethics, freedom of the press, and the principles of journalistic writing--are powerful tools. In the early 1970s, two Washington Post reporters uncovered a scandal known as Watergate and eventually a president was forced to resign. In this course, the students will learn how to generate story ideas, conduct an interview, and then put it all together to write both news and sports stories. Students will also be introduced to feature writing and editorials. Students will be part of a team of students who will write articles for an online newspaper. Students should plan on spending eight to ten hours online each week to complete the required assignments in this one-semester course.

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

ONLINE LANGUAGE COURSES:

 

French I:

French I has been carefully designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Each unit embodies all of these standards in accordance with the theories described in this document. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that the student meets all standards. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams. Learning activities in each unit are focused upon a specific theme:

• Greetings, Introductions, Good-byes and Alphabet

• Calendar: days, months, seasons, and numbers

• Familiar objects and places

• Family

• Food

• Pastimes

• School objects and routine

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

French II:

French II has been carefully designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for a method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Each unit embodies all of these standards in accordance with the theories described in this document. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that the student meets all standards. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams. Learning activities in each unit are focused upon a specific theme:

• Daily routine

• Animals

• Entertainment

• Body parts

• Descriptions: personality and physical traits

• House: rooms and furniture

• Shopping and clothing

• Meals

• Sports and recreation

• Transportation

• All first year topics

Prerequisite: French I

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

German I:

German I has been carefully designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Each unit embodies all of these standards in accordance with the theories described in this document. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that the student meets all standards. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments projects, quizzes, and exams. Learning activities in each unit are focused upon a specific theme:

• Greetings, Introductions, Good-byes and Alphabet

• Calendar (days, months, seasons) and numbers

• Weather

• Time

• Colors

• Familiar objects and places

• Family

• Food

• Pastimes

• School objects and routine

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

German II:

German II has been carefully designed to meet the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). These standards call for method of teaching that focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture. Each unit embodies all of these standards in accordance with the theories described in this document. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture to ensure that the student meets all standards. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams. Learning activities in each unit are focused upon a specific theme:

• Daily routine

• Animals

• Entertainment

• Body parts

• Descriptions: personality, physical traits

• House: rooms and furniture

• Shopping and clothing

• Meals

• Sports and recreation

• Transportation

• All first year topics

Prerequisite: German I

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

ONLINE SCIENCE COURSES:

 

Environmental Science (11/12th grade elective):

This course is divided into two semesters. The first semester focuses on an introduction to environmental science, including understanding the importance of ecosystems, biodiversity, and natural resources. Factors that cause pollution, loss of biodiversity, and resource depletion within ecosystems are also introduced. The second semester will focus on water quality, water diversion, water pollution and water levels, all important environmental issues that affect everyone in Michigan. Water is just one of the issues touched on in Environmental Science. In this course students will draw conclusions about various environmental issues, including soil and land issues, renewable and non-renewable energy sources, waste, toxicology, environmental health, greenhouse gases, species extinction, and world population growth. Students will also research an environmental issue of interest. Students will be required to take a final exam, which requires a proctor. Students must pre-arrange for a proctor with the school. This course requires a book with an approximate cost of $145.00

Credit Earned: 1.0

 

Introduction to Forensic Science (10/11/12th grade elective):

This course is designed to introduce students to the application of science to criminal investigation. Chemistry, biology, earth science, and a brief mention of physics are included. As students work through the lessons, they will learn the scientific background of forensic tests and then apply their knowledge through exercises, case studies, and a final case that encompasses all topics introduced throughout the term.

Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Advanced Forensic Science (11/12th grade elective):

Advanced Forensic Science continues the study of crime scene reconstruction, evidence collection, and interpretation of data that began in Introduction to Forensic Science. Students will learn to interpret measurements taken at crime scenes and use that information to reconstruct the crime, work with drawing software in developing a crime scene sketch, determine the direction of impact, and interpret accident data. The course introduces computer forensics and internet crimes as well as addresses internet safety.
Credit Earned: 0.5

 

Oceans and Their Ecosystems (10/11/12th grade elective):

Oceans and Their Ecosystems is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts of oceanography and to develop an understanding of marine ecosystems. Topics include water and differences, ocean ecosystems, circulation, resources, and air/water interaction.

Credit Earned: 0.5

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